Tag Archives: Interior Design

Cool office redesign for storage provider City Box


City Box has undergone a considerable transformation. The Dutch branch of the supplier of storage space wanted to position itself as a quality brand and this meant its image of price fighter had to go. This called for a broad approach in which this vision had to be translated into concrete and tangible design ideas and implementations. The logo, pay-off, interior and exterior of the head office; work wear, signage of the branches, as well as the interior and exterior of the pilot branch in Den Bosch have been dealt with. Amsterdam based Studio Babette Porcelijn was hired for this extensive operation.

Sketch for City Box office redesign by Babette Porcelijn

Sketch for City Box office redesign by Babette Porcelijn

The client first
From the first moment customers connect with City Box, usually through the website or at one of the branches, they should feel welcome and that City Box is thinking along with them. In consultation with Babette, City Box’s Online Product Manager and external experts improved the website. The site addresses its visitors directly and offers them the possibility to arrange most things online. This functionality will be gradually extended in the near future. Not only the website, but also the reception area of the branches were improved. Before, clients had to ring the bell so an employee could let them in. Now, the door automatically opens. Babette designed a coffee corner for the pilot branch in Den Bosch where customers and employees can have a quiet conversation, or customers that are in the middle of moving house can recover their breath.

Coffee Corner in one of City Box's branches. Photography - Babette Porcelijn for City Box

Coffee Corner in one of City Box’s branches. Photography – Babette Porcelijn for City Box

 

Recycled materials in the interior design

The customer experience plays an important role in the new service centre that Babette equipped. Next to high-end materials Babette also used second hand products, building materials, and cardboard in the design of the interior. A counter made from stacked up removal boxes, different types of chairs all spray-painted in one colour, lamps made from porcelain cups or cardboard, a table top featuring old record sleeves, and Persian rugs; they all refer to the world of moving house, renovating or storing dear personal items.

Old record sleeves and unicolour painted vintage furniture recreate the world of storage and personal belongings. Photography: Babette Porcelijn for City Box

 

Use of vintage finds, recycled materials and hints to the world of storage and personal belonings in City Box service center interior. Photography: Babette Porcelijn for City Box

Use of vintage finds, recycled materials and hints to the world of storage and personal belonings in City Box service center interior. Photography: Babette Porcelijn for City Box

Babette: “It was fantastic to be able to create an overall concept like this. I got a chance to use all my skills and knowledge. From translating City Box’s vision into a brand strategy, to the design and realization of concrete solutions. To make all this happen I worked with various experts from my network and external companies that City Box does business with. I also received a lot of help from City Box’s own employees. Together we were able to deliver the quality that you can see today.’

Babette has a degree in Industrial Design Engineering at the TU in Delft. She spent ten years working for design agencies as a communication designer. Her clients included Sara Lee, Heineken International, KLM, and E.ON, but also for small and medium sized enterprises. Since 2011 Babette has been working as an independent strategic designer. She develops the strategy, design, and content of communication means. She works cross-media, creating interior design, graphic design and interactive design. Among her clients are ‘dienst Noord/Zuidlijn’, Griph law & tax, KWPS, Urban Resort and Pit4Business.

 

The Future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades! Neon and Fluorescent inspired interiors


Fluorescent and neon inspired interior. Hotel la Belle Juliette, Paris

Fluorescent and neon inspired interior @ decorationtrend.com

Bright pop and neon inpsired interiors by TrustedRegina

Neon pink office @ decoist.com

Wicker; trend to be left in the Golden Girls’ home? Or on its way back?


Remember the Golden Girls? Off course you do. We just sat through ALL seasons again and loved them. And not just for the stories. I absolutely loved seeing that decor again. I remember loving those pastels when I saw the show first as a kid. The pale blues, tappid greens, peach pinks, matte beiges and the wicker… the wicker everywhere. But I want to bet you that wicker is hard on its way for a massive come back if it hasn’t arrived yet. And I think there will be enough room for a serious nod to the shoulder pad days. And I even think some relatives of the same pastels will be joining….

So maybe not exactly like this………

 

But more like this…

 

Yes I know, not wicker but ratan. Who made you king of woven furniture?

Don’t remember or know Lloyd Loom yet? Make a note of that name. It’s coming back!

 

Want to join me on the lanai?

Now where did I see these chairs before…….

Aah, yes….

 

In that case……

There you go….

I wonder what’s next…

Pink arches, glass beds, white high gloss tables and beige leather anyone?

 

 

Yves Klein blue


Yves Klein (28 April 1928 – 6 June 1962) was a French artist who was an important member of the  Nouveau réalisme movement. He was instrumental in the development of performance art. But he is also known for a well-known series of ultramarine blue monochrome paintings he first exhibited in Milan in 1957. This deep, lapis lazuli like, blue became known as International Klein Blue. He later used this same colour for his famous ‘Anthropometries’ series for which he covered women’s naked bodies with IKB and had them jump or fall against white linen and canvasses.

Yves Klein Anthropometries of the Blue Period

Untitled blue monochrome by Yves Klein

Today the colour is used in both contemporary and classic interior designs.

Yves Klein painted walls in an interior shot featured in Elle Décor

Yves Klein coloured coffee table and pillow cases. Photo from coralwhenblue.blogspot.com

Table revamp with IKB wall by Naomi Stein in post on Apartmenttherapy.com

An IKB painted feature wall in New York Magazine

 

Artless limited edition Melinda Chair in IKB wool

 

 

 

 

Louis XVI inspired interior design


Nothing like a  bit of interior design inspiration for those dreadful Monday blues.

When, in 1793, the guillotine cut off his head, he probably had no idea how his legacy would live on in furniture. Trends come and go, but the style named after this notorious French King, is always in fashion. Here’s a couple Louis XVI inspired interiors to feast your eyes on.

I love how in this case, Louis XVI style chairs are mixed with quintessential 1970’s elements.

Aaaah, another zebra.. We here at Homevoyeurs love them

A lovely classic interior with a minimalist twist. I love the Yves Klein-esque blue flower fabric on the chairs!

The Starck chairs are almost as old as Louis himself would’ve been, but they work really well in this bright ensemble!

In my humble opinion, the armoire in this design is a wrong choice. I would’ve gone for a darker natural wood, or maybe even glass. This looks to ‘Brocantish’.

Mediaeval times trend in interiors 2013/2014


According to the forecast of famous trendwatcher Lidewij Edelkoort, Middle Ages inspired interiors and accessories are the new trend for 2014. Voluminous details, rich textures and deep, rich colours as if dyed by hand.  And think woods, grey slates, bricks walls, brass accessories and rugs. Here a mood board compiled with pictures I found online.

Here the large window, matte painted wall, rugs and chandelier are obviously inspired by interiors from the Middle Ages

Mediaeval Inspired Kitchen

Bold colours in a sober design scheme

But this interior design also took inspiration from Mediaeval times. The curved brick ceiling is reminiscent of (and maybe even is) that of an old dungeon

Restaurant designer David Collins dies


David Collins, founder of the well-known London-based interior design studio with the same name, died last Wednesday after a short battle with skin cancer. Collins was best known for the design of famous restaurants including The Wolseley, Nobu, Massimo in London and many more in the USA and abroad. He also designed for various hotels and wellness facilities as well as the occasional residential project.

 

Massimo Restaurant and Oyster bar designed by David Collins. Image source: Dezeen.com

A message on his website reads “It is with great sadness that we announce the death of David Collins following a short but valiant battle with cancer.”