Tag Archives: design

Kendrick Bangs Kellogg designed Joshua Tree rock house for sale


For the first time since its construction, this architectural master piece is on the market. Kendrick Bangs Kellogg designed it for Beverly Doolittle and her husband in the late eighties. They had bought a rocky hillside plot in desolate Joshua Tree National Park, and wanted something that blended in with its naked surroundings. That Kellogg succeeded might be proven by the fact that this home is relatively unknown. Maybe people never spotted it. The roof looks likes a large ribcage carved out of pebbles. The colour is a slightly duller hue than the red rocks it is surrounded with, but it almost looks as if it was shaped by nature.

Kendrick Bangs Kellog’s villain lair – pictures by TTK

It’s spectacular nonetheless. LA Curbed.com describes it as a supervillain lair, and it very well could be indeed! It can be yours for $3000.000. Check the original listing here.

Living room – pictures by TTK

Bedroom – pictures by TTK

The roof looks like a rock carved rib cage – pictures by TTK

 

 

Marble


Yves Klein blue


Yves Klein (28 April 1928 – 6 June 1962) was a French artist who was an important member of the  Nouveau réalisme movement. He was instrumental in the development of performance art. But he is also known for a well-known series of ultramarine blue monochrome paintings he first exhibited in Milan in 1957. This deep, lapis lazuli like, blue became known as International Klein Blue. He later used this same colour for his famous ‘Anthropometries’ series for which he covered women’s naked bodies with IKB and had them jump or fall against white linen and canvasses.

Yves Klein Anthropometries of the Blue Period

Untitled blue monochrome by Yves Klein

Today the colour is used in both contemporary and classic interior designs.

Yves Klein painted walls in an interior shot featured in Elle Décor

Yves Klein coloured coffee table and pillow cases. Photo from coralwhenblue.blogspot.com

Table revamp with IKB wall by Naomi Stein in post on Apartmenttherapy.com

An IKB painted feature wall in New York Magazine

 

Artless limited edition Melinda Chair in IKB wool

 

 

 

 

Bathroom retile. Black and whites


A last post before I leave for a well deserved trip to Tuscany!

Our bathroom is showing some serious wear and tear. It’s a shame really because it’s not that old. It was installed and tiled in 2007, and looked good for about ten minutes before the tiles started fading. They are big grey slate tiles, and to be honest; I am a bit fed up with those anyway. They were a bit too much of a trend so you now see them in all renovations done between 2006 and 2010. Time for a re-tile it is.

Current bathroom. The floor is not visible, but believe me when I say it looks nothing like the slate on the walls anymore

Current bathroom tiles. They look great on the wall, it’s the floor where the problems start

 

 

You can see the faded tiles in the shower. They tick me off each day and it's just not worth it.

You can see the faded tiles in the shower. They tick me off each day and it’s just not worth it.

We are leaving the grey slate on the walls, and I am thinking of treating them with an oil finish to make them stand out. For the floor I am either thinking black and white, or just white. Either way, a smaller tile as I think the contrast with the bigger grey slate will look great. Have a look at some of the pictures I collected on my pinterest moodboard. I looked for pictures with a distinct darker colour on the walls to highlight the contrast between the floor and walls.

Love this. It obviously means I’ll have to infuse my bathroom with a few more brocante or antique-ish items, but I guess I could give our bathroom a similar feel. Painting the bathroom rack black or dark grey/blue is a start. Maybe add a small chair?

A clean look, with small white tiles. They are not expensive either. I’d make the seams between the tiles a bit thicker to really show the contrast. And I’d make them dark. This because it would look better, but also because white seams are a nightmare to keep clean

 

Love this too. Small round tiles, the so-called ‘penny rounds’, found in many American bathrooms from 1940’s and 1950’s. I love how they instantly give character to a bathroom

 

I also thought of maybe going for a more elaborate floor with a massive contrast effect. But as we are thinking of maybe putting up the house for sale next year, this might not be too great an idea…..

Just look at the floor in this one as the rest is a bit tacky. I do have a thing for marble though….. I bet this would look great with the rugged, dark slate…. But I am dreading even thinking of the final invoice….

 

What do you reckon I should do?

 

 

How LED suffers from a bad rep without deserving it


It was as if we were forced to say goodbye to our good old lightbulbs. From one day to the next, or at least it felt like it,  the cosy glow, lamps that actually lit up right away, were harder and harder to find on the shelves. We were all a bit confused why they were bad for us all of a sudden. And even more frustrating, in return we were given weird shaped fluorescent lamps exuding harsh and unfriendly light. And it took forever to actually exude anything. Sometimes it took minutes to light up completely. The dissatisfaction we felt might be part of the reason why we are not all loving LED bulbs. Because LED bulbs  offer all the good things we liked in our good old bulbs, yet without compromising on our demand for green and eco-friendly. The light is warm, cosy or bright if you need it, and the bulb lights up immediately after its switched on. And what’s best; LED light comes from computer chips. Companies like Philips have already developed special products  and apps that allow you to control the colour or brightness of lighting from you smart phone or tablet. Imagine the possibilities!

Example of an interior design making use of LED lighting

Designers were the most adamant opponent of LED. Yet they are now also the group embracing LED because of its sheer endless stream of opportunities. More and more architects, designers and artists  choose to use LED in their work. The CN tower in Toronto for instance was relit in 2007 making use of LED. Before that the tower was sparsely lit to save energy. LED allows to illuminate the tower fully, with even less energy. And this is just one of many examples of the last few years.

The CN tower is lit with LED since 2007

After a long refurbishment, the Dutch Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam decided to commission Philips to light up the building with LED

Slowly but gradually consumers are embracing LED too. People from the industry expect LED to be responsible for 16% of sales in the residential sector by 2015. Since it’s introduction, LED has grown in popularity and has shown to be in increasing demand by consumers. Interior designers, lamp manufacturers and home/deco stores believe in LED too, and are eager to tell their customers why. A representative of New York based Oriental Lamp Shade Company  commented on how consumers can benefit from LED. “LED lasts a lot longer than regular incandescent lighting. Not only does this mean customers save money, but it also makes LED more eco-friendly. We find that to be an important consideration for customers when they buy lamps and lighting. The rather steep investment pays itself back in more ways than just the longevity. LED uses far less electricity too. Something consumers are beginning to realise more and more. We think eventually LED will be the main source of light we all use”.

A stunning wine cellar with LED lighting as part of the main design

 

‘Paper Vase Cover’ allows you to create your own designers vase


The ‘Paper Vase Cover’ is what it says it is. A vase cover made of paper. It allows you to create a modern design piece out of an ordinary vase or bottle. Because of the folded creases, the vase can be shaped to your liking and fits most standard sized vases or bottles.

Pepe Heykoop ‘Paper Vase Cover’

The vase is made by women in India working for the Tiny Miracles Foundation. When you buy the ‘Paper Vase Cover’, you automatically help the Pardeshi community in India to establish an independent livelihood. The designer, Pepe Heykoop, was awarded the Interior Innovation Award at the imm Köln in 2013.  The retail price is € 21,50  Check out the webshop of MoreThanHip, a site dedicated to ecological and fair trade design and fashion accessories.

Pepe Heykoop ‘Paper Vase Cover’ comes in three colours.

Skycraper designers forgot to design elevators


It was designed as a beacon of prosperity – the Intempo Skyscraper in Benidorm. A proud building to show that the popular beach town was not affected by the crunch. In a rush of greed and over-excitedness, the design was changed from an original 20 storey building, to a 47 storey one. Too bad they didn’t redesign the elevator shafts and room for technical equipment, as the space needed for elevators serving 47 floors is now simply not available. The building however, as the images shows, is near completion.

Photo: Gizmodo / Economia – The designers of this building forgot to design elevators